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Copyright © 2001-2015 Christian Jaeger, unless stated otherwise within a file.

Contents

  • 1. Licensing
  • 1.1. The Perl 5 terms
  • 1.2. The Artistic License 2.0
  • 1.3. The MIT License (MIT/Expat)
  • 2. Why so many licenses?
  • 1. Licensing

    This is free software; you can choose between the following licenses (again, unless stated otherwise in a file):

    1.1. The Perl 5 terms

    This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl 5, which (as of the time of this writing) means the terms of either:

    a) the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 1, or (at your option) any later version,

    or

    b) the "Artistic License".

    For more details please see Perl Licensing.

    1.2. The Artistic License 2.0

    See Artistic License 2.0.

    1.3. The MIT License (MIT/Expat)

    Copyright © 2001-2015 Christian Jaeger, unless stated otherwise within a file.

    Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

    The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

    THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

    2. Why so many licenses?

    The Perl 5 licensing is to make it as simple as possible for people to decide to use the project or contribute to it. The Artistic License 2 is what the main Perl 6 implementation components have chosen; the idea to offer it under that license as well is that porting to / using with Perl 6 becomes as easy as possible. The MIT licenses is offered so that the code can be used in different environments as well (like perhaps a contributor would like to port it, or pieces, to a different programming language.)

    You could license your contributions in any one of those licenses, but we would appreciate if you could provide them under the same full set of licenses. If you've got objections or questions about the licensing, please don't hesitate to ask.